Month: June 2022

Ruth Ozeki

I was so excited to see last week that Ruth Ozeki won The Women’s Prize for Fiction 2022 for her novel The book of form and emptiness. If you are passionate about books and libraries and what really matters, this is for you.

I fell in love with Ruth’s writing when I read A tale for the time being, one of her previous novels and now one of my favourites. Her writing is thoughtful, quirky and compassionate –  highly reccommended. And Ruth is a fascinating person, not only a writer but a film maker and Zen Buddhist priest.

Ozeki is the 27th winner of this prize which was established in 1996 to offset the tendency of major literary prizes to ‘overlook accomplished, challenging, important fiction by female authors’.   Check out these previous winners below (clicking on the cover takes you to our catalogue entry for that title).

Jill.

Weave your way into our Matariki Kakahu@ Te Pātikitiki  

Colour in a feather to reflect your experience of Our Library or your reflections on the past year or hopes for the upcoming year!  We have a feather template below you can download and print.

Drop them in to any Palmerston North City Library, send via email, Facebook Messenger, post, or just come and colour them in here at Te Pātikitiki. 

Whaea Ruth will whatu (weave) your creations into our Kakahu that has our Pātikitiki as the Taaniko pattern. 

This is an ongoing project and we hope to reach everyone who has grown up here, had their heart touched or their needs met. Please spread the word and the template. 

There will be spot prizes for the feather that has come from the furthest distance, the one with the most moving message and the one with the most spectacular colours. 

From Whaea Ruth and the team at Te Pātikitiki

Want to learn a language?

If your New Years resolution was to learn a new language this year but you haven’t started yet don’t worry, we can help you! Not only do we have books in our libraries to help you learn a language but we also have access to some great digital resources such as Mango Languages to help you. You can get free access to Mango Languages with your library card.

There are many languages to choose from on Mango Languages, from Arabic to Yiddish, with a few fun ones in between like Pirate and Shakespearean English.

You can also find Mango Languages on the app store, or google play store.

Digital Resource: LinkedIn Learning for Library

LinkedIn Learning for Library offers free access to thousands of online courses.

LinkedIn Learning for Library is a great digital resource you can use for free with your library card, so you do not need a LinkedIn profile. There are heaps of learning opportunities from learning how to use and understand Microsoft Office products, customer service techniques or even creative things like how to do animations.

There is a link on our website or you can download the LinkedIn Learning app. After you download it from your app store, click on Sign in, then click on Sign in with your library card to log in through our Library.

You’ll be prompted to enter our Library’s ID, and then your library card number and pin. Note: the Library ID is at the end of the LinkedIn Learning invitation link, and is palmerstonnorthcitylibrary (lower case and one word).

Young Adult LGBT titles

We’re testing out a new app that creates promotional images – here’s a list of LGBT-themed Young Adult books, and if you click on a cover in the image below it will take you straight to that title on our library catalogue!

Library newsletter

Stay up to date with the Palmerston North City Library – subscribe to our monthly newsletter!

Each month you’ll get an email highlighting what’s coming up, things we’re excited about, and ways to get the most out of your library membership.

Sign up here, or simply ask a librarian next time you’re visiting one of our branches.

Selector’s Picks

I always tell people that the most stressful part of my job as a Content Development Librarian is never having enough time to read all the amazing books I see and handle every day on the job.

My TBR pile is huge, scattered across several Living Rooms in the Fiction area. Here’s a smattering of my recommendations.

Charity Norman’s latest title, Remember me sounds very appealing with an unsolved cold case and  fraught familial relationships in a  New Zealand setting. I’ve read several others of Charity’s books and thoroughly enjoyed them.

I don’t think Patrick Gale could ever surpass his sublime 2007 novel Notes from an exhibition but I’ll read anything he writes regardless. Mother’s boy, his 17th novel apparently,  is based around the known facts of the boyhood and youth of the great Cornish poet, Charles Causley and the life of the mother who raised him singlehandedly.

For Lucinda Riley fans, The murders at Fleat House has just been released in New Zealand. As the title implies this one is a murder mystery and according to very reliable sources – it is a page-turner from beginning to end! Originally written in 2004/2005 and now published posthumously. Reserve it now.

British-Turkish novelist Elif Shafak is a writer I greatly admire. Her pocket-sized non-fiction title How to stay sane in an age of division is an absolute gem. I recently read 10 minutes 38 seconds in this strange world and now her latest The island of missing trees is on my TBR list. Hers is a voice for the unheard, the unloved, the outcast. Listen to this recent interview with her on RNZ  – Elif Shafak: The Island of Missing Trees | RNZ

Reviews for Unsheltered by Wellington based novelist Clare Moleta have consistently been very positive so this one has found a place on my list as well – a dystopian novel where Li is searching for her eight-year-old daughter Matti, who she’s been separated from in a fire which broke out during the clearance of an unsanctioned Makecamp – a refugee settlement. Described by Elizabeth Knox as ‘extraordinarily suspenseful’.

Jill